Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Deus: The American

bike_exif_logo_5b

AMAZINGLY PERFECT!

Deus: The American

Deus Motorcycles
Deus has opened shop in L.A., on the corner of Lincoln and Venice Boulevards. And this is the first full-blown custom motorcycle to roll out of its doors: an intricately crafted machine packed with high performance parts and a healthy dose of attitude. It’s called ‘The American’, and it began as a personal project for Michael Woolaway, Deus’ Design Director in the US. Woolaway’s goal was to convert the legendary C&J Low Boy dirt-track chassis into a street legal cafe racer, using as many American parts as he could.
Deus Motorcycles
Woolaway located a C&J frame and sent it to Dr. John’s Motorcycle Frame Straightening in Anaheim. After it came back dead straight, the motor was installed. And this is no ordinary mill: it’s built up with a Harley Sportster five-speed lower end, bob-weight-balanced crank performance rods, forged J&E high compression pistons, and Edelbrock big valve cylinder heads.
Deus Motorcycles
The front suspension is Buell, with triple clamps hand-made at the dirt track specialists Durelle Racing. The hand-built rear shocks come from Works Perfomance, the Sun Rims from Buchanan’s, and the knock-off hubs and brake hangers from A&A Racing. The characteristically minimal Motogadget speedo and electronics add to the race-inspired vibe. It’s all topped off with typically luscious paint and a pair of SuperTrapp mufflers that look the business (and no doubt sound even better).
Deus Motorcycles
“The American is a Deus concept through and through,” says Woolaway, “taking inspiration from the shapes of the past.” To my eyes, it’s the perfect mix of old and new. Head over to the Deus website to examine The American in even more detail.
Deus Motorcycles
Deus Motorcycles
Deus Motorcycles

Beer of the Day


New Belgium Dig: Pale Ale: 5.6% ABV: Seasonal Release: 6pk and draft
Unearth your bottle-opener because this Pale Ale is something you can Dig. Sorachi Ace hops provides a fresh Spring zing with incredible lemon aroma. Nelson Sauvin is next in line with bursts of passion fruit, mango and peach. American favorites, Cascade and Centennial round out this crisp, clean Pale Ale. Dig in!

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

The Bacon Run

Bacon is good, Bacon can be fun, mostly when your eating it on a motorcycle run...




The Beer Booters is sponsoring this, why? because its stupid and we like stupid matter of fact we are stupid and being stupid is fun so check yourself and be stupid once in a while - go on the ride, get in on the raffle and win yourself a beer boot and T'shirt.....eat bacon!

Beer of the Day


Green Flash Palate Wrecker: Double IPA: 9.5% ABV: Seasonal Release: draft and package
Palate Wrecker was originally brewed for the Hamilton’s Tavern 2nd Anniversary celebration. It’s the most complicated West Coast – Inspired IPA we have ever brewed – mashing and sparging with hopped wort, in addition to our hop layering regimen for IPA. By popular demand, it is not released for the world to enjoy.

Monday, February 27, 2012

Happy Monday


The bike that inspired me to build an XS650

Just - well just



Beer of the Day


Deschutes Red Chair: Northwestern Pale Ale: 6.4% ABV: Seasonal Release: 6pks and draft
Red Chair NWPA is named after the oldest operating lift at Mt. Bachelor in Central Oregon. And just as the locals line up for that fabled mountain ride, they flock to our Bend brew pub whenever it goes on tap. One thing we’ve learned, "when the brew pub talks, listen." For the past two decades, the serious beer fanatics down there seldom miss when we’ve hit on something truly special. What makes this copper colored beauty so wildly popular? As a debut Northwest Pale Ale, it’s an adventure all its own. It has a plush body with satiny caramel flavors derived from seven varieties of malt. Yet, despite it all, it remains a hop-forward ale with that distinctive citrusy punch. Just minus any mouth-puckering bitterness.

Sunday, February 26, 2012

Saturday, February 25, 2012

90's GT 24 Speed Series

Picked this up last week so I can ride around with my boy on a similar bike. Its super light for a 24", I literally jumped the shit out of this bike today, only realizing that Im old and havent rode a BMX since my teens and above all - I suck. I will be changing that - super fun...see you at the track!
You dont see that everyday


My Sons 16" Dyno


Friday, February 24, 2012

Im So Fucking Tired Friday

What

Lame, I mean rad, I mean lame, I mean - whatever
I like

That last dude is so bummed


I hate Yamaha XS650 choppers, but this one I make the exception

Thank god its Friday but I feel like Im cross eyed!


This Weekend

What to do, what to do?

Big 3 Auto Parts Exchange

The 46th annual antique and collector car parts exchange and swap meet will be held at Qualcomm Stadium on the weekend of February 24th, 25th & 26th, 2012. The shoppers hours are 12 noon to 4 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Sunday. 


Lame HD chrome stuff, allot of lowrider, fixie bicycle stuff and a little bit of gold piled in the back - all for $10 whole dollars, for what Im not sure.






My pal Allen from Lady hump is puttin on a ride to the Gasser Lounge for the Johnny Cash Bday Bash, this is one I would LOVE to go on - bummed! have fun, be safe and let me live vicariously through you Internet Chopper Heroes.


If your bored this weekend and dont have an excuse, then your - LAME!

Beer of the Day


Rogue John John Dead Guy: Heller Bock: 8.2% ABV: Limited Release: 22oz
In a collaboration of crafts, Rogue Brewmaster John Maier and Rogue Spirits Master Distiller John Couchot have joined forces to create a distinct, innovative series of brews called John John Ales. The series will take Rogue Ales legends and age them in Rogue Spirits barrels. A 3,100 gallon batch of John John Ale produces 1357 cases of beer. The first of the John John series is John John Dead Guy Ale, Rogue’s award winning Dead Guy Ale matured in Rogue’s award winning Dead Guy Whiskey barrels. Deep honey in color with a malt aroma, a caramel, vanilla and oak finish.

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Its another Random Day

Sorry guys, been real busy with the Baby, family, sons bday etc...Good Times!

Anyhow, we have some Beer Booter announcements coming up shortly, check back!






Beer of the Day


Rogue Chatoe Dirtoir:  Schwartzbier: 5% ABV: Limited Release: 22oz
Jet black in color with a tan head, medium to full bodied, deftly balanced, seamless dark roasted malt flavors with a smooth bitterness, lingering long finish.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Beer of the Day


BEER OF THE DAY IS BACK!




Rogue XS Imperial Stout: Imperial Stout: 11% ABV: Limited Release: 750mL
Imperial Stout, also known as “Russian Imperial Stout” is a variety of ale that was originally brewed in England for export to the court of the Tsar of Russia. Its high level of hopping is intended to preserve it during long trips and to provide a more bracing drink against cold climates. The colour is very dark, nearly opaque black. Imperial stout exhibits enormously powerful malt flavours, hints of dark fruits, and is often quite dry.

Monday, February 20, 2012

Happy Presidents Day

As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy. Whatever differs from this, to the extent of the difference, is no democracy.
President Abraham Lincoln


Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company.
President George Washington
 
IMO - There has and never will be a greater President than Gorge Washington, he literally walked the walk and talked the talk. A great man that literally changed the world...


Belgian Beer 3rd Monday and Last / Gueuze

 This is the Last of the Belgian Beer outlines, I hope some of you enjoyed and I hope that Steffan from Zombie Performance recognizes - lol

If you Get a chance go and try some of these that I have posted for the last three weeks, they are literally the craft beers of Europe and will change your world if you have never experienced them.


Gueuze

Aroma: A moderately sour/acidic aroma blends with aromas described as barnyard, earthy, goaty, hay, horsey, and horse blanket. While some may be more dominantly sour/acidic, balance is the key and denotes a better gueuze. Commonly fruity with aromas of citrus fruits (often grapefruit), apples or other light fruits, rhubarb, or honey. A very mild oak aroma is considered favorable. An enteric, smoky, cigar-like, or cheesy aroma is unfavorable. No hop aroma. No diacetyl.
Appearance: Golden in color. Clarity is excellent (unless the bottle was shaken). A thick rocky, mousse-like, white head seems to last forever. Always effervescent.
Flavor: A moderately sour/acidic character is classically in balance with the malt, wheat and barnyard characteristics. A low, complementary sweetness may be present but higher levels are uncharacteristic. While some may be more dominantly sour, balance is the key and denotes a better gueuze. A varied fruit flavor is common, and can have a honey-like character. A mild vanilla and/or oak flavor is occasionally noticeable. An enteric, smoky or cigar-like character is undesirable. Hop bitterness is generally absent but a very low hop bitterness may occasionally be perceived. No hop flavor. No diacetyl.
Mouthfeel: Light to medium-light body. In spite of the low finishing gravity, the many mouth-filling flavors prevent the beer from tasting like water. Has a low to high tart, puckering quality without being sharply astringent. Some versions have a low warming character. Highly carbonated.
Overall Impression: Complex, pleasantly sour/acidic, balanced, pale, wheat-based ale fermented by a variety of Belgian microbiota.
Comments: Gueuze is traditionally produced by mixing one, two, and three-year old lambic. “Young” lambic contains fermentable sugars while old lambic has the characteristic “wild” taste of the Senne River valley. A good gueuze is not the most pungent, but possesses a full and tantalizing bouquet, a sharp aroma, and a soft, velvety flavor. Lambic is served uncarbonated, while gueuze is served effervescent. IBUs are approximate since aged hops are used; Belgians use hops for anti-bacterial properties more than bittering in lambics. Products marked “oude” or “ville” are considered most traditional.
History: Spontaneously fermented sour ales from the area in and around Brussels (the Senne Valley) stem from a farmhouse brewing tradition several centuries old. Their numbers are constantly dwindling and some are untraditionally sweetening their products (post-fermentation) to make them more palatable to a wider audience.
Ingredients: Unmalted wheat (30-40%), Pilsner malt and aged (surannes) hops (3 years) are used. The aged hops are used more for preservative effects than bitterness, and makes actual bitterness levels difficult to estimate. Traditionally these beers are spontaneously fermented with naturally-occurring yeast and bacteria in predominately oaken barrels. Home-brewed and craft-brewed versions are more typically made with pure cultures of yeast commonly including Saccharomyces, Brettanomyces, Pediococcus and Lactobacillus in an attempt to recreate the effects of the dominant microbiota of Brussels and the surrounding countryside of the Senne River valley. Cultures taken from bottles are sometimes used but there is no simple way of knowing what organisms are still viable.
Vital Statistics: OG: 1.040 – 1.060
IBUs: 0 – 10 FG: 1.000 – 1.006
SRM: 3 – 7 ABV: 5 – 8%
Commercial Examples: Boon Oude Gueuze, Boon Oude Gueuze Mariage Parfait, De Cam Gueuze, De Cam/Drei Fonteinen Millennium Gueuze, Drie Fonteinen Oud Gueuze, Cantillon Gueuze, Hanssens Oude Gueuze, Lindemans Gueuze Cuvée René, Girardin Gueuze (Black Label), Mort Subite (Unfiltered) Gueuze, Oud Beersel Oude Gueuze

Sunday, February 19, 2012

Martial Arts



This explains 99% of every Karate, Taiji, Kungfu, Boxing, Kickboxing, Korean Dojos (actually ALL Korean Dojos) etc...

So True

100% ................                dumb!

Hahahaha - so true - Hey! I know Taiji....eerk
You going to do it, do it right

Belgian Beer 2nd Sunday - Fruit Lambic

 

Aroma: The fruit which has been added to the beer should be the dominant aroma. A low to moderately sour/acidic character blends with aromas described as barnyard, earthy, goaty, hay, horsey, and horse blanket (and thus should be recognizable as a lambic). The fruit aroma commonly blends with the other aromas. An enteric, smoky, cigar-like, or cheesy aroma is unfavorable. No hop aroma. No diacetyl.
Appearance: The variety of fruit generally determines the color though lighter-colored fruit may have little effect on the color. The color intensity may fade with age. Clarity is often good, although some fruit will not drop bright. A thick rocky, mousse-like head, sometimes a shade of fruit, is generally long-lasting. Always effervescent.
Flavor: The fruit added to the beer should be evident. A low to moderate sour and more commonly (sometimes high) acidic character is present. The classic barnyard characteristics may be low to high. When young, the beer will present its full fruity taste. As it ages, the lambic taste will become dominant at the expense of the fruit character – thus fruit lambics are not intended for long aging. A low, complementary sweetness may be present, but higher levels are uncharacteristic. A mild vanilla and/or oak flavor is occasionally noticeable. An enteric, smoky or cigar-like character is undesirable. Hop bitterness is generally absent. No hop flavor. No diacetyl.
Mouthfeel: Light to medium-light body. In spite of the low finishing gravity, the many mouth-filling flavors prevent the beer from tasting like water. Has a low to high tart, puckering quality without being sharply astringent. Some versions have a low warming character. Highly carbonated.
Overall Impression: Complex, fruity, pleasantly sour/acidic, balanced, pale, wheat-based ale fermented by a variety of Belgian microbiota. A lambic with fruit, not just a fruit beer.
Comments: Fruit-based lambics are often produced like gueuze by mixing one, two, and three-year old lambic. “Young” lambic contains fermentable sugars while old lambic has the characteristic “wild” taste of the Senne River valley. Fruit is commonly added halfway through aging and the yeast and bacteria will ferment all sugars from the fruit. Fruit may also be added to unblended lambic. The most traditional styles of fruit lambics include kriek (cherries), framboise (raspberries) and druivenlambik (muscat grapes). ENTRANT MUST SPECIFY THE TYPE OF FRUIT(S) USED IN MAKING THE LAMBIC. Any overly sweet lambics (e.g., Lindemans or Belle Vue clones) would do better entered in the 16E Belgian Specialty category since this category does not describe beers with that character. IBUs are approximate since aged hops are used; Belgians use hops for anti-bacterial properties more than bittering in lambics.
History: Spontaneously fermented sour ales from the area in and around Brussels (the Senne Valley) stem from a farmhouse brewing tradition several centuries old. Their numbers are constantly dwindling and some are untraditionally sweetening their products (post-fermentation) with sugar or sweet fruit to make them more palatable to a wider audience. Fruit was traditionally added to lambic or gueuze, either by the blender or publican, to increase the variety of beers available in local cafes.
Ingredients: Unmalted wheat (30-40%), Pilsner malt and aged (surannes) hops (3 years) are used. The aged hops are used more for preservative effects than bitterness, and makes actual bitterness levels difficult to estimate. Traditional products use 10-30% fruit (25%, if cherry). Fruits traditionally used include tart cherries (with pits), raspberries or Muscat grapes. More recent examples include peaches, apricots or merlot grapes. Tart or acidic fruit is traditionally used as its purpose is not to sweeten the beer but to add a new dimension. Traditionally these beers are spontaneously fermented with naturally-occurring yeast and bacteria in predominately oaken barrels. Home-brewed and craft-brewed versions are more typically made with pure cultures of yeast commonly including Saccharomyces, Brettanomyces, Pediococcus and Lactobacillus in an attempt to recreate the effects of the dominant microbiota of Brussels and the surrounding countryside of the Senne River valley. Cultures taken from bottles are sometimes used but there is no simple way of knowing what organisms are still viable.
Vital Statistics: OG: 1.040 – 1.060
IBUs: 0 – 10 FG: 1.000 – 1.010
SRM: 3 – 7
(varies w/ fruit)
ABV: 5 – 7%
Commercial Examples: Boon Framboise Marriage Parfait, Boon Kriek Mariage Parfait, Boon Oude Kriek, Cantillon Fou’ Foune (apricot), Cantillon Kriek, Cantillon Lou Pepe Kriek, Cantillon Lou Pepe Framboise, Cantillon Rose de Gambrinus, Cantillon St. Lamvinus (merlot grape), Cantillon Vigneronne (Muscat grape), De Cam Oude Kriek, Drie Fonteinen Kriek, Girardin Kriek, Hanssens Oude Kriek, Oud Beersel Kriek, Mort Subite Kriek